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  Tuesday, 13 December 2016
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:D :D :D I know this question is going to sound, like, REALLY dumb to you people who use MIDI a lot (I'm even kind of surprised I'm asking the question, I should know this after six years of MIDI experience) but, what exactly is portamento? Please don't criticize me for this question, I'd like to keep some face while gaining knowledge of the wonderful world of MIDI!

Thanks in advance

Chris Seddio
5 years ago
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#561
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Portamento also needs to be distinguished from glissando.
If you run your thumb quickly across the notes of a piano or a harp you have a glissando, a fast run of distinctly separate notes.
If you take a trombone, start sounding a note, then slide the tube up or down whilst still playing, you have portamento.
The names are frequently interchanged, and a trombonist will usually call the slide "a gliss".
The word is Italian, like most musical terminology. Means to slide between notes. See the Wikipedia for a long explanation.
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As for MIDI: the MIDI specification specifies:
When a Note-On is received after a Portamento Control message, the voice's pitch will glide from the key specified in the Portamento Control message to the new Note-On's pitch at the rate set by the portamento time controller. […]
5 years ago
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#561
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Portamento also needs to be distinguished from glissando.
If you run your thumb quickly across the notes of a piano or a harp you have a glissando, a fast run of distinctly separate notes.
If you take a trombone, start sounding a note, then slide the tube up or down whilst still playing, you have portamento.
The names are frequently interchanged, and a trombonist will usually call the slide "a gliss".
5 years ago
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#581
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Thank you all very much, I appreciate all of your help in this matter!:D
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